The extraordinary life of conjoined twins who refuse to be separated: Lupita and Carmen, 16, love playing piano, doing handstands, and dressing up together. But doctors warn they cannot survive together much longer

By MARY KEKATOS

Lupita and Carmen Andrade, 16, were only expected to survive for three days after they were born.

Most conjoined twins die shortly after birth – but the girls defied the odds and continued to thrive.

The twins, from New Milford, Connecticut, have learned to share every part of their lives.

When talk of separation surgery came up, Lupita and Carmen asked their mother, ‘Why would you want to cut us in half?’

The girls are attached along their chest walls down to their pelvis where their spines meet.

They each have two arms, but only a single leg, with Carmen controlling the right leg and Lupita, the left.

But as they’ve grown older, health problems are emerging and the girls’ future could be in jeopardy.

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Carmen (left) and Lupita (right) Andrade, 16, of New Milford, Connecticut, were born joined from the chest wall  down to the pelvis - known as omphalopagus  twins

Carmen (left) and Lupita (right) Andrade, 16, of New Milford, Connecticut, were born joined from the chest wall down to the pelvis – known as omphalopagus twins. Continue…

Each of the girls has a separate heart, a set of arms, a set of lungs and a stomach (Carmen, left, Lupita right)
However, they share some ribs, a liver, their circulatory system, and their digestive and reproductive systems (Carmen, left and Lupita, right)
 

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